Sunday, April 05, 2015

Google AdWords Basics

You will be buying ads on Google SERPs (Search Engine Results Pages) using Google's AdWords system.






How it works:

Use Google AdWord's Keyword Planner tool.
You decide when you want your ads to appear by choosing a list of keywords that, when someone enters those keywords, your ad will appear.

You decide :
  • Geographically where you want your ads to appear.
  • How much you're willing to pay per click (CPC = Cost Per Click; PPC = Pay Per Click)
  • How much you want to spend per day.
  • Your start and stop dates.
  • Whether or not you want your ads to appear on non-search pages, such as this:



You need :

Access to AdWords. You'll have to set up a free account: look for the "Start Now" button, click it, and then follow all of the instructions.



Be sure you click the "Skip the guided setup" link, or else you'll be in a perpetual limbo where Google will continuously ask for your credit card information before it lets you access the AdWords tool you need to determine CPCs for your keyphrases!



Next, check CPC and traffic estimates:

To determine the cost per click (CPC) of keywords in Google's AdSense program, follow the following steps here (you'll have to sign up for a free AdSense account).

Click the area that reads:
"Get search volume for a list of keywords or group them into ad groups"

Then, type in all of the keywords/keyphrases you're considering, separating them with commas.

You can search for the exact volume and cost for each of  your three cities, but this is not actually required for your assignment.

Then click "Get search volume"

You'll see a chart that indicates both volume, and the estimated cost per click (CPC).


Sunday, March 01, 2015

INTERNET Banner Ad CPMs and Unique Visitors

CPM Rates:
To determine the CPM (cost per 1,000 impressions) for banner ads, use the Average CPM Banner Ad Rates sheet provided in your assignment packet.


Unique Visitors:
To determine the number of unique visitors to your site, use any of the following sources that might provide that data, or Google "how many unique visitors to MySite.com".

Compete.com

Quantcast.com

HypeStat.com

TELEVISION HH NUMBERS AND CPP

To determine the cost of a :30 TV spot, you need both the rating for the show on which you want to advertise, and you need the cost per point (CPP).

Find the CPP for each of your cities at this Kantar Media / SRDS Source: DMA (Designated Market Area) Profiles

  1. Determine your 3 cities 
  2. Click "Profile" link
  3. Current Total HH: Look in the upper left for this number
  4. Squad Cost Per Point (CPP): Look in right column, middle of page. You'll need to know when your show airs to know which daypart CPP to  use.



Daypart chart here:


Monday, February 10, 2014

MAGAZINE INFORMATION

To find magazines that reach your target audience, you'll use SRDS. You may also choose to include in your search some of the other sources listed.

START HERE:
SRDS / Standard Rate and Data Service -- in Owens Library Reserve Section
These are your best sources for media rate and audience information. These books will help you find and choose your magazines and newspapers. Owens Library Reference Section has the following SRDS books: Circulation, Consumer Magazine and Newspaper sourcebooks.

The Consumer Magazine book has an index in the front to help you find magazine titles by topic. The Newspapaer book has lists of newspapers by market (city), and it also lists national newspapers at the beginning of the book. The Circulation book provides you information about which magazines and newspapers are delivered to specific markets (cities); therefore, you can look up your target market and find newspapers that are distributed within that city.


OTHER SOURCES:
Mediamark Research -- Mediamark's MRI+ offers rates and circulation as well as demographic data, along with lifestlye and product usage for many publications. You must establish a free user account to access most data. Once you are logged in, go to the "Publication Search" area and conduct a keyword search based on your target market -- it's best to do this in the "Editorial Calendar" area. This will produce for you a list of related publications, and information about each.

Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) -- This is the "police force" for magazine circulation, so they provide circulation data for magazines. The link here is a good place to look for magazines within targeted interests. The circulation figures you can obtain from this source are basic, but enough for your media plan.

Magazines.com -- search for magazines within specific interests.

Magazine-Agent.com: Search magazines by category.

Owens Library has the following source: Gale Directory of Publications and Broadcast Media in the Reference Collection. The call number is Ref 016.071 A97 2002.


Thursday, February 06, 2014

RADIO INFORMATION & RATINGS

Ratings and Format Information:

1) Start by identifying a format that best matches your target audience.
  • Radio formats defined: Radio Station World 
  • Check this source for detailed listener demographics by format: Katz Radio Group. (Click the "Formats" link, then choose the formats  you're interested in.)
  • Demographic breakdown of radio formats: R+TBR [You can only access 1x per day.]
  • Brief description of formats by demographics: AllBusiness.com  A few nuggets here, too.
  • As you're honing in on a format that matches your target, do some Google searches like this general one or this sports-radio-focused search. These types of searches will provide you more focused support for your format choice.
2) Then find stations in your DMAs (cities) that have that format, and check the rating of those stations.

SQAD Cost Per Point (CPP): 
SRDS, Standard Rate and Data Service Radio and Broadcast directories -- Located in Owens Library's Reference Section. This directory provides market/geographic information; it will help you identify television networks and shows, along with radio stations and formats.



Dayparts:
AM = M-F 6AM-10AM
Day = M-F 10AM-3PM
PM =M-F 3PM-7PM
Evening = M-F 7PM-12 Midnight





Tuesday, February 04, 2014

TELEVISION SHOWS

Looking for television/cable programming to reach your target? Start with the first two links below: TVGuide.com and Yahoo directory.

Use these search tools to find shows that relate to your target's pyschographic interests. You can then Google the name of the show plus the word "rating" and hope to find the rating for the show. You'll have a hard time with this, and most of you simply will use ".5" or "1" as a rating, since you're not likely to be purchasing a cable TV show with a higher rating.



TVguide.com:  Type keywords that related to your target group in the search tool to find shows that your target is most likely to watch.

Zap2It.com has a searchable database of current TV shows.

Try Googling "TV Shows" -- You'll find some reasonable databases such as Amazon's TV shows, Hulu and TV.com.

http://www.zap2it.com/
This site allows you look at what is currently running on all TV stations (cable, satellite and local) for a specified zip code and look up what will be running within the next 15 days.
NAVIGATE: From the homepage, type any zip code and the site will upload what is scheduled for the next three hours. Use the arrows at the top of the page to advance or go back in hours. You can also adjust the date you look at by selecting the scroll down menus above the schedule.

WorldScreen.com's listing of all network programs, with ratings by demographic breakdowns. This helps you find shows, but not necessarily shows that are currently broadcast, so way down on your priority list for research!

Wikipedia's List of TV shows is a decent source, too. But be careful, this is not just U.S. based! If you choose a show from this list, be sure it airs in the United States!


THE FOLLOWING LINKS ARE FOR "EXTRA" RESEARCH, DO NOT START WITH THESE SOURCES!
http://www.stationindex.com/tv/tv-markets
This site lists all the television stations in a market without all the smaller stations and all the digital, analog and off air stations. It also provides direct links to the stations websites and other contact info. I have found that this site is the most user-friendly and efficient for getting listings of major TV stations in a market.


Looking for the CBS or NBC station in your market? All of these networks have sites that will list all of their affiliates in the United States.
NAVIGATE: Go to the stations corporate pages (i.e.: http://www.cbs.com/) and search for local affiliates.

100000 Watts Paid directory of US radio and TV directory; will only help you search news databases.

Saturday, February 01, 2014

TELEVISION RATINGS

The following sources are links to Neilsen rating data. Most links will provide only the top 10 or top 20 shows. Your chosen show is probably not in the top 10 or top 20 (at least it should NOT be -- if you are choosing shows with ratings this high, there is a problem with your targeting efforts!). You'll use this data as a starting point to help you understand the rating for your chosen shows.

Remember: 70% of all TV shows have a rating of .5 or less.

Here's a great source for the 2014-15 season.

You can find ratings for a number of TV shows by using this Zap2It source. Just click which ever category might make sense for your shows. For example, click "Daily Cable Final TV Ratings" then click the first entry. Scroll down a bit and you'll see a big list of cable ratings. You may or may not find your exact show, but this gives you better judgement when you "guess" your show's rating.

Neilsen Media Research -- Top 10 TV ratings by broadcast, syndication, cable, African American and Hispanic viewing.

USAToday's expanded Neilsen listing.


WorldScreen.com's listing of all network programs, with ratings by demographic breakdowns. This helps you find shows, but not necessarily shows that are currently broadcast, so way down on your priority list for research!

Excite's listing of rating points for the top 20 shows of the week. [Note: this link doesn't seem to be working as of October, 2013.]


THE FOLLOWING LINKS ARE FOR "EXTRA" RESEARCH, DO NOT START WITH THESE SOURCES!
http://www.stationindex.com/tv/tv-markets
This site lists all the television stations in a market without all the smaller stations and all the digital, analog and off air stations. It also provides direct links to the stations websites and other contact info. I have found that this site is the most user-friendly and efficient for getting listings of major TV stations in a market.


Looking for the CBS or NBC station in your market? All of these networks have sites that will list all of their affiliates in the United States.
NAVIGATE: Go to the stations corporate pages (i.e.: http://www.cbs.com/) and search for local affiliates.

100000 Watts Paid directory of US radio and TV directory; will only help you search news databases.

Friday, January 31, 2014

GOOGLE Search and Video

--- GOOGLE ADVERTISING: General

Before you can begin to determine prices (CPC, CPV, etc) and parameters (geography, demographics, etc.) of any Google ads, you'll need to have a Google account. All Google accounts are linked, so if you already have a Gmail account, you don't need a new Google account. You'll also find that it helps to have a web site that you can use as a placeholder web site when you go through the steps of determining your Google ad campaigns. Ditto for a YouTube account/channel.

1. Get a Google account (like Gmail)
2. You'll need an AdWords account -- it's free
3. Have a web site that you can "play" with. I recommend using your portfolio site. If you don't have one yet, you should. Here are some tips.
4. Have a YouTube account/channel for video ads.



--- SEARCH ADS  (Ads on SERPs and text ads within Google's network):

To determine the cost per click (CPC) of keywords in Google's AdSense program, follow the following steps here (you'll have to sign up for a free AdSense account).

Click the area that reads:
"Get search volume for a list of keywords or group them into ad groups"

Then, type in all of the keywords/keyphrases you're considering, separating them with commas.

You can search for the exact volume and cost for each of  your three cities, but this is not actually required for your assignment.

Then click "Get search volume"

You'll see a chart that indicates both volume, and the estimated cost per click (CPC).


--- VIDEO ADS  (YouTube-based and video ads within Google's network):

If you plan to advertise on YouTube, you should watch this video (also shown below), which walks you through the steps and the ad options.

At minimum for your assignment, you'll choose to run ads on a cost per view (CPV) basis, which is very similar to the CPC basis for search ads.

You should modify your "Search" spreadsheet to accommodate your video decisions.